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Loch Asynth, Coigach peninsula


Home -> Europe -> Scotland -> Travelogue Scotland -> 24 September 2001

Monday 24 September, Loch Asynth, Coigach peninsula

This last day in the Highlands we want to see the west coast another time, at any rate. But also a part we have not seen before. Therefore we go to Coigach, north west of Beauly. The day starts gray, a bit drizzly.
Loch Glascarnoch Loch GlascarnochThe sky does not look very promising, but the farther we drive to the west, the more blue pieces appear in the sky. These pictures are of Loch Glascarnoch, where we have been before.
Tom Ban MorThe sun is shining on Tom Ban Mor (742 metres high) and we cheer up. Fortunately, our moods don't depend on the weather, but it is always nicer when the sun is shining. Only a few military fighter jets disturb the quietness, by flying very low through the valleys. Because of the desolate areas here, it is an excellent exercise terrain for the Nato. But we get really scared when we saw them flying so low over our heads.
Ullapool Elisabeth at UllapoolSoon we see Ullapool, sparkling in the sun. Elisabeth has her sunglasses ready.
Loch AsynthPast Ullapool, the road winds to the north with the Coigach area on the left, with mountains up to 900 metres, a lot of bays and inlets and of course many rivers, brooks and small lochs. A pretty area with only a few roads. To the right our first view on Loch Asynth with the ruins of Castle Ardveck in the distance.
Loch Asynth en Ardvreck castle Loch AsynthThe remains of Castle Ardvecke lonely stand in this quiet lake, in this quiet region. It was build in 1597 and no entrance fee is charged. It is also possible to have your wedding here.
Past Ardveck one can take the road to the north, but we had done that last year. This time we drive along Loch Asynth, onto the Coigach peninsula. There we go southward. A tour with lots of hills, mountains, valleys, brooks, islands, bays and inlets, enough to have a very enjoyable time.
Coigach peninsulaFirst we arrive at Lochinver, a small village, with almost no shops, but to our surprise there is a cashing machine. The coast here is whimsical and the rocks are steep. The big clouds, which sometimes darken the sky, make the scenery into a real Scottish picture. How we love Scotland...
Coigach peninsula Coigach peninsulaThe narrow road along the coast is quite spectacular, especially on the southern part of Coigach with view on the Summer Isles.
Coigach peninsula Coigach peninsulaThere are more villages hidden on this peninsula then one would expect. We take all the roads we cand find on the map, to see as much as possible of this area.
Sheep on the road Highlanders on the roadThe unevitable sheep and cows have a good life here, as they walk freely about. The hills look barren but there is enough to graze for them.
Achiltibuie Oykel BridgeAnd here at Achiltibuie, the most important village of the peninsula, Teije walks about freely. It is still windy but warm enough to walk around in t-shirt.
After spending a few hours driving around and taking a walk now and then, we go on our way back, but with a detour. First we drive a bit to the north, then to the east, through Strath Oykel. It is a single track road which passes the Oykel Bridge Hotel. In the middle of nowhere there is a hotel here and a very lonely phone box.
Estate at Kyle of SutherlandAlong the Kyle of Sutherland we see this nice entrance to some estate. Well, we have seen stables in Scotland which look like small castles. The weather has changed and becomes real bad now. The last 100 kilometers on the B9176 (mostly a single track road) therefore seems very long. But it is a very beautiful area, with lots of forests and hills.
Teije in our hotel room, BeaulyAt home (every place where we spend the night in our holidays we calll 'home') we take a long rest period, but after that we have to go down to the pub again, of course. It is our last night in The Caledonian and, naturally, it is late, very late before we go back to our room.

 


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